Sichuan Earthquake Update

Help the Earthquake Children to Recover

Keeping love alive for a very, very long haul

Tuesday, May 27th, 2008

Keeping love alive for a very, very long haul
By Fu Jing
Updated: 2008-05-27 07:39

Like many kids, one-year-and-half old Zhong Minhan loves yo-yo. At 2:28 pm of May 12, she was awakened from her afternoon nap, promptly got up and sat down at bed enjoying the two-minute swing with smiles.

And even now, she does not know that the yo-yo has claimed thousands of lives in many cities, towns and villages of her home province Sichuan. But she does know that she could not see her father Zhong Ying easily during the past two weeks as he has always been at the frontline handing out food, medicines and even worked as a guide for journalists.

Zhong, aged 28, is part of the influx of volunteers extending their helping hands to those parents who lost their kids and students who lost their parents to the quake, the aftershocks, landslides and floods of quake lakes.

With him as a guide, our China Daily reporting team reached several devastated towns in high mountains, sometimes by foot, walking on broken railways and twisted bridges and finally had talks with survivors escaping from their homes in the dense forests.

Zhong is not only a guide for our photographer and me. He was so warm-hearted that every time we came back from Deyang, our car would be filled with water, food, clothes gathered by him from his relatives or friends.

And he told me: “In this hard time, you journalists should not only work for your paper but give help and aid at the same time.”

I could not agree with him more.

(more…)

Teacher’s love

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

Translations from Chinese by Candice Zhou

In the Wenchuan earthquake, Huanhuan kindergarten in Zundao town was collapsed at the moment more than 80 children were having their noon snap. Three teachers and more than 50 children are killed in the disaster. Now two teachers are injuried and under operation. One child is still missing.

After the earthquake, parents were gathered around the ruins, calling their children’s names from time to time. At the beginning, children could give faint response. But as time passed by, the response became weaker and weaker. Parents felt helpless, sitting near the ruins, anxiously waiting for the rescuers.

The head of the kindergarten bursted into tears when she recalled the time when one of her teachers, Miss Qu Wangrong was found by the rescue team. “At that time, Miss Qu flutter to the ground, with her back firmly blocked the collapse of the concrete sheet, arms still firmly holding a child. The child is rescued, but Miss Qu has left us forever.”

In the ruins, you can see small pillows, quilts and shoes everywhere. People don’t want to imagine the helplessness and panic at that time. However, it’s because an ordinary people just like Miss Qu, we have more children rescued.

original links: http://club.news.sohu.com/r-zz0081-107431-0-0-0.html

Poem by Zhang Suning: If you’re alive, then mum is too

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

Second poem by Zhang Suning, inspired by the events during earthquake rescue operation. Zhang Suning recited the poem during the Edinburgh charity auction for the earthquake children.

My darling baby, if you’re alive, then mum is too

by Zhang Suning (Chinese version here)

Translated from Chinese to English, by Yuhua Hu

If you're alive, so is mum
When the rescuers found her, she had died, killed by the house that collapsed. She died in a very unusual posture. She was kneeling on the floor, the whole upper body stretched forward with her arms supporting her whole body. The posture looked like the kneeling Koutou etiquette in ancient China, but her body was completely distorted by the pressure. When people cleared away the rubble around her, they found a baby was lying underneath her body, wrapped up in a small red blanket with golden patterns. The baby was about 3, 4 months old. Because of the protection from his mother’s body, he was still peacefully asleep when found. The rescuing doctor found a mobile phone inside the blanket, and on the screen of the phone, there was a message ‘My darling baby, if you survive, please remember I love you’.

My darling baby, if you’re alive, then Mum is too

My darling baby, you are still alive
It was Mum who had given you life

It was the second time Mum had given you life
The other time Mum was in great pain
This time Mum is in heaven above
–but now Mum can kiss you no more

My darling baby, you are still alive
It was Mum who had given you life

It was the second time Mum had given you life
Mum gave up her future for your future
Mum sacrificed her life for your life
–and now Mum will only appear in your dreams

Mum must have fed you for the last time
Mum must have changed your nappy for the last time
Mum must have kissed you again and again, till her last breath
Mum must have kept talking to you, till the last moment

My darling baby, you are alive, this was Mum’s hope
My darling baby, as long as you’re alive, Mum’s hope goes on
–a hope that was sheltered by a delicate body
–a hope that was raised up by an immortal life

My darling baby, if you are alive, then Mum is too
Mum’s blood is running in your vessels
Mum’s genes are thriving in every one of your cells
My darling baby, if you are alive, then Mum is too
You are Mum’s dreams in heaven
You are the resurrection of Mum’s life
My darling baby, if you are alive, then Mum is too
You are the extension of Mum’s life
You are the eternity of a mother’s love
My darling baby, if you are alive, then Mum is too
Forever alive, in your life

Poem by Zhang Suning: Is any survivor here this child’s family member?

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

A poem written by Zhang Suning, inspired by the events in the rescue operation. Zhang Suning recited the poem during the Edinburgh charity auction.

‘Is any survivor here this child’s family member?’

by Zhang Suning (Chinese version here)

Translated from Chinese to English, by Yuhua Hu

Is any survivors here this child's family member?

2am, 13 May. A medical team member in Dujiangyan, “Is any survivor here this child’s family member?”

I don’t know your name
but I know you are your parents’ baby
I don’t know your age
But I know you and my child are the same age
I don’t know whether your parents are still among us
But I know you are safe in the arms of this unfamiliar Aunt
I don’t know if you’re fast asleep, or in a coma
but I know you’ve just suffered a hellish trauma

Perhaps in your dreams you are remembering your mum’s kisses so dear
Perhaps in your coma you are stroking your daddy’s beard
Perhaps you have not woken from the shock yet
Perhaps you have remained among the memory before the Quake still
Perhaps you’re still waiting for your Mum and Dad to come back
Perhaps you are waiting for when you need no more ‘perhaps’

‘Is any survivor here this child’s family member?’
This is an anxious call of searching
This is an eruption of suppressed sorrow
This is a desperate cry of a grief-stricken heart
This is a faint hope among the immense suffering
‘Is any survivor here this child’s family member?’
This call is an earthquake shaking my soul
Ripping apart every parent’s heart

Child, I beg you to wake up soon
You still have many people who care for you
We are waiting for you to come back safe
We willl see to that a bright future will come apace
Child, I beg you to wake up soon
You are Sichuan’s child
You are China’s child
You are our child, everyone of us

SichuanEarthquake.org.uk
Mother Bridge of Love LinkChinese UK
Chinese Young Professionals in Edinburgh
Ricefield